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One of the best things about a change of season is that you and the furkids get to shake things up and turn the boring old routine that was summer into brand new activities and goodies that make for a whole new set of memories. To get you started, we’ve put together a virtual box of autumn doodads for dogs (and you) to get the inspiration going.

BEDS, BLANKETS, BOOTS AND COATS

What better time than autumn to do a complete bedroom revamp for the canine kids? Here are the Autumn 2017 décor trends that are likely to give fuzzy family members a warm feeling inside.

  • Contrasting the cold, hard metal and plastic that dominate our world, the Tactility Trendwill bring soothing textures into the home with the use of soft throws and fluffy stools.
  • The Cosy Hovering Trendwith the hanging of swing chairs on the patio, encouraging relaxation with a book. The feeling of suspension creates a space of comfort.
  • Neutral pastels continue this sense of calm into the bedroom area with the popularRose Gold Trend – used in home and décor accessories.
  • For the Urban Jungle Trend, we reconnect with the natural world by bringing greenery and wooden features into the home.
You and your pooch can find your inner autumn decorating mojo and stay right on trend by visiting our selection of great online shops. And don’t forget to order in towels for the wet season – we recommend the Microfibre super absorbent pet towel and the Buddy & Friends Super Absorbent Pet Towel.

INDOOR GRASS

The fake stuff: When it’s too cold to go outside for older dogs and young pups, fake grass can be a good substitute. You can buy the Four Paws Wee-Wee Patch Indoor Potty Replacement Grass from apetslife.co.za. The patch looks and feels similar to real grass and is infused with antimicrobial agents and attractants to eliminate smells. Other suppliers:

Takealot.co.za
poochpatch.co.za
smartgrass.co.za

INDOOR ACTIVITIES

You’ll find a whole lot about this a little further on.

GOOD READS

Nothing says autumn like curling up on the couch with the furkids or on that patio swinging chair, snug as a bug, with a good book in hand. Here are a couple of good reads we’d recommend to get you started.

A Place Called Home: Toby’s Tale

By GA Whitmore

Every rescue dog has a story uniquely their own. Toby’s Tale takes you on a journey across the USA, and across the spectrum of life’s emotional and spiritual experience. Born on a small farm in northern California, Toby narrowly escapes the death sentence imposed upon him by his breeder. Through a series of events driven by good intentions, he finds himself in a Connecticut suburb where life with his new family soon collapses on him, and his newfound happiness is brutally destroyed. On his quest to find a place to call home, Toby encounters and endures the best and worst of humanity as he comes face-to-face with sorrow and joy, fear and courage, and ultimately, with the power of love.

Wish Me Home

By Kay Bratt

A hungry, stray dog is the last thing Cara Butter needs. Stranded in Georgia with only her backpack and a few dwindling dollars, she already has too much baggage. After a lifetime of family troubles, and bouncing from one foster home to another, Cara decides to leave it all behind and strike out alone—on foot. She sets off to Florida to see the home of her literary hero, Ernest Hemingway, accompanied only by Hemi, the stray dog who proves to be the perfect travel companion. But the harrowing trip takes unexpected turns as strangers become friends who make her question everything, and Cara finds that as the journey unfolds, so does her life—in ways she could never imagine.

TELLY WITH THE FURKIDS

Pitbulls and Parolees

An inspirational show that follows the day-to-day operations at the Villalobos Rescue Centre, including rescues of abused neglected, and abandoned dogs, and the centre’s efforts to adopt out dogs to new owners.

 The Vet Life

Doctors Blue, Ross and Lavigne have moved to Houston to open a full-service veterinarian hospital and animal shelter together. The series captures the doctors’ lives as they juggle running a new business while managing their family life filled with spouses, parents, in-laws, children, pets and friends, as well as their intense moments saving the lives of animals at their clinic. Catch it on Animal Planet this autumn. Don’t have DStv? Catch our very own Dr Jen Stock, TEARS veterinarian, as she shares the highs, lows and dramas of being a welfare vet on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tears_vet/

Animal Cops Houston

This is an American documentary that takes place in Houston, Texas and focuses on the work of the Houston Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Not always an easy watch, but there’s loads of inspiration in every episode.

GROOMING

Waterless shampoos for dogs and cats are a great way to freshen up between baths in the colder weather. Ask the advice of your groomer or vet before choosing a waterless shampoo for your dog or cat.

Coats

Some people think that dogs with long coats need a minimum of grooming during the cold, wet season. But thick coats can be more of a curse than a blessing if not kept in a healthy condition. Hair that becomes matted does not insulate the dog from the cold; instead, matting is painful and can hide hot spots or lead to infections below the skin. So, keep up the grooming in the months ahead.

Winter bath time

Dogs sometimes need more grooming in winter, particularly if they walk through mud and spend more time indoors which can lead to an increase in “doggie” odour. When bathing your dog in winter, make sure they’re completely dry before going outside. This is especially important for small breeds or short-haired dogs. If your habit is to let your dog air-dry, it’s best to blow dry her, as long as she isn’t terrified of the blow drier, in which case, use a super absorbent towel to dry her off and keep her in a warm room until she’s completely dry.

Winter haircut

You might think that cutting your dog’s coat in the cold weather compromises your dog because she needs her coat to keep warm. Although this is true, it’s also true that she if in a loving home, she isn’t living outside, but snuggled up with you in a heated house. If you’re worried that your dog will get cold on outings, you could consider a longer trim or a doggie coat.

Nail trimming

It’s likely that your dog might spend less time outdoors on walks or for play time in the colder weather. This means, your dog’s nails might need to be trimmed more often since they aren’t outside running and romping to wear them down. Check weekly, and once you hear that “click-click” on the bare floor, you’ll know it’s time to trim.